"You can’t measure time by days the way you measure money by dollars and cents, because dollars are all the same while every day is different and maybe every hour as well."

Jorge Luis Borges (via likeafieldmouse)

blastedheath:

Anna Katrina Zinkeisen (British, 1901-1976), Still Life with Conch Shell and Pink Valerian. Oil on canvas, 24 x 29 cm. (9 x 11 in.)

blastedheath:

Anna Katrina Zinkeisen (British, 1901-1976), Still Life with Conch Shell and Pink Valerian. Oil on canvas, 24 x 29 cm. (9 x 11 in.)

(via female-arthistory)

verylargebuildings:

Jason Fox
Untitled, 2013
acrylic, graphite and aluminum on canvas, 30 x 24”

verylargebuildings:

Jason Fox

Untitled, 2013

acrylic, graphite and aluminum on canvas, 30 x 24”

doskapozora:

Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
(Gettin major johnmartinbell vibes from this)

doskapozora:

Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell

(Gettin major johnmartinbell vibes from this)



likeafieldmouse:

Betsy Dadd - Sum of Parts (2011)

likeafieldmouse:

Betsy Dadd - Sum of Parts (2011)

theories-of:

Agnete Krogh Vinkler

theories-of:

Agnete Krogh Vinkler

gentilfarfalletta:

mentaltimetraveller:

Nina Canell, Treetops, Hillsides & Ditches (Detail), 2011

Raw chicle, gum base, logs

gentilfarfalletta:

mentaltimetraveller:

Nina Canell, Treetops, Hillsides & Ditches (Detail), 2011

Raw chicle, gum base, logs

(via longhairshorttemper)

ifveniceissinking:

A collection of seaweed from the Jersey area of the United Kingdom, circa 1850s. Courtesy the Natural History Museum, London. Above: Two cyanotype prints from Anna Atkins’ “Photographs of British Algae,” released as a series between 1843 and 1850.

ifveniceissinking:

A collection of seaweed from the Jersey area of the United Kingdom, circa 1850s. Courtesy the Natural History Museum, London. Above: Two cyanotype prints from Anna Atkins’ “Photographs of British Algae,” released as a series between 1843 and 1850.

(via female-arthistory)

earlymodernart:

Edgar Degas - Forest in the Mountains, c. 1890

earlymodernart:

Edgar Degas - Forest in the Mountains, c. 1890

(via nopenope)

"There are a number of people whom you might think of as casualties of the myth of the artist…. Often one hears or reads accounts in which people will say, Well, he may have treated his children, wives, friends terribly, but look at the novels, the poems, the paintings. I think it’s a terrible equation. Obviously one can’t choose to be, as it were, a good parent or a good artist, but if the art legitimates cruelty, I think the art is not worth having. People should be doing everything they can to be as kind as possible and to enjoy each other’s company. Any art, any anything, that helps us do that is worth having. But if it doesn’t, it isn’t."

Adam Phillips, crucial anti-genius!  (via doskapozora)

(via doskapozora)